Rants

.zip files from Mac OS show up as green/encrypted

Green files and folders on Windows 7 indicate they are encrypted.

Usually this is a function of a program that will make these files encrypted for a reason. Security is usually the reason. But…

An interesting little bug in the process of creating a .zip file on a mac and moving it over to a Windows computer.

When a .zip file is created according to standards for .zip files found here:

http://www.pkware.com/documents/casestudies/APPNOTE.TXT

They specify that .zip archives include a tag informing about itself to the program trying to decompress the archive. This tag information is known as the “version made by” and as the name suggest, it would tag information about the program version of .zip and the files system in use.

 0 - MS-DOS and OS/2 (FAT / VFAT / FAT32 file systems)
          1 - Amiga                     2 - OpenVMS
          3 - UNIX                      4 - VM/CMS
          5 - Atari ST                  6 - OS/2 H.P.F.S.
          7 - Macintosh                 8 - Z-System
          9 - CP/M                     10 - Windows NTFS
         11 - MVS (OS/390 - Z/OS)      12 - VSE
         13 - Acorn Risc               14 - VFAT
         15 - alternate MVS            16 - BeOS
         17 - Tandem                   18 - OS/400
         19 - OS/X (Darwin)            20 thru 255 - unused

When the Mac system encrypts the files, it marks them with the attribute of being UNIX based files. Correct considering the Mac operating system is based on UNIX.

The problem arises at the Windows end. Because Windows is created by the most arrogant computer company in the world, it does not recognise that a .zip file could have been created with a computer that is not running Windows. It fails to correctly see the flag as UNIX and marks the files as Encrypted.

Leaving Files Encrypted

If the files are left as encrypted, you may find that there are problems if the files are shred on a network drive etc. Taking ownership will not change this flag, and resetting permissions does nothing.

The Easy Fix – Remove Encrypted Tag

Removing the incorrect Encrypted Flag on a green file in Windows 7, or Windows Server is really easy. Right click the file or files (holding the shift key to select multiple folders and files) then Click: Properties / Advanced / Un-tick the Encrypted Option

 

That’s about it. All fixed.

Microsoft–You Suck Balls!

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I find it absolutely incomprehensible how hard it is to purchase a Microsoft Product and actually gain access to it.

Over the years, things have always been hard, but appear to have got a lot worse.

My Experience with MSDN Subscription.

In December I receive notice that our existing MSDN subscription is due to expire, so I set about renewing it. Now with any other company, you would just enter a credit card number into a website some place and you would be done. But Not Microsoft.

Microsoft force you to purchase through a reseller (and I get that) so we set about that path.

Our previous reseller was Ingram Micro, who totally destroyed their own business by interdicting SAP some time ago, and have got nothing right since then! So we followed the Legendry Microsoft License Expert “Shane Piercy” to Dicker Data and purchased our license there. (Thanks Shane, that was the easy part).

After some weeks, Microsoft approve our license and send an email with some details.

We then login to Live.com and revalidate an email address that we have used, validated and sign in daily with for the past 10 years. This take 3 days.

We then go to the Volume License website and find the new license needs to be added. We do this, and are advised that we again need to validate our email address. This takes 48 hours (actual time was 4 days). – Remember it is computers doing all this tricky validating of email addresses by sending us an email with a link to click.

We then check back for days in the Volume License website and are advised in the FAQ that validating the license and email can take several days. Go figure!

Finally after 5 days the license appears, and we find that we need to then assign it to a user. We start doing this and fail several times before ringing their Asian America support line and chat to a helpful person who suggest a lot of things before mentioning the catch phrase “What version of IE are you using?”  – I almost blurt out… “Why would I use such a F#&!ed browser!” before explaining that I was using Chrome. Heaven forbid I was on a Mac and did not have access to IE at all.

We finally worked out that IE is required for “This Website” even though there is no detection on the website warning you of this.

So I fired up IE, and set about assigning a user to this license before I get this error.

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Lucky I am on the phone to the Philippines at the time and ask.. “What Next?”

MS support take all my details again, and advise they will assign the license. This will take only 1 hour to complete. (Believe that when I see it).

I ask for an email address for my support dude. No, he does not have an email address, only a team address that I can use his name in and someone may forward it to him. Remember here I am communicating via a POT (Plain Old Telephone) to the number 2 (I like saying that) IT company in the world. Why can’t I email the dude, or skype, or MSN, or live chat, or SMS, or whatever.. No the only way to get him is call a POT and wait in queue like I did in the last century.

So now I wait. 30 days down, and still no access to something I have paid for. Can you frigging believe it!

The story is not over yet, but I just know I will not have access in 1 hour from now. That would be way to easy.

Microsoft – if you want to know why you are failing. It is because everything you do is 10 x harder than it needs to be. Compare this experience to Apple App store on the Mac!

You have a lot of catching up to do MS!

Outlook Hangs (stops responding) Opening Email Messages Sent from PayPal

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Outlook hangs caused by PayPal messages template fault

imageIn just the last few days, I have started experiencing some issues with Outlook when opening messages sent from PayPal.
This is happening with the recent versions of Outlook, including Outlook 2010 and Outlook 2007.
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Some of the indications of the problem include.

  • Outlook taking longer than normal to open.
  • Outlook with “Reading Pane” on
  • Outlook Stops Responding when clicking on an email from PayPal.
  • If you wait a long time, it will come good, and even show the email message.
  • If you are impatient and cancel out of outlook, your reading pane is gone when you next open it.

When loading Outlook you receive a message about and address: Contacting: \\102.112.207.net\b\ss\paypalglobal\1\G.4-NS
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Background information

It appears that the cause of this is some malformed tracking cookies being sent from PayPal.
While it could be argued that Outlook should handle this invalid link much better than it does… We all know that Microsoft is responsible for Outlook, so really we should not expect too much in the way of “graceful error handling”. (After 20+ years of Windows system events, they still don’t have an online library of error codes and meanings.)
At the bottom of the message, there is a hidden tracking image. Instead of this image pointing to a web server, it is pointing to a non-existing network share. As it is pointing to a network share and not to a web server, Outlook’s “Internet picture blocking” functionality doesn’t kick in and tries to retrieve the content.

So what to do what to do?

First, I know for a fact that PayPal is aware of this issue, and while it is literally a 10 min fix for the right person, we know that finding the right person probably means contacting the dev team out of India that they hired last month, and asking them to fix their crap!
Oh I have been doing this too long!
Really… what to do!

  1. Nothing… If you are patient when opening email messages from PayPal while this issue happens, then they will open.
  2. Delete all recent messages from PayPal permanently form both your inbox and deleted items.
  3. Turn off the reading pane in Outlook.
  4. Turn your Outlook into plain text preview
    image
  5. Redirect the invalid call using a modification to hosts

    1. Start Notepad as an administrator.
      You can do this by right clicking on the Notepad shortcut in the Start Menu and choosing “Run as administrator”. If you don’t see this option, hold SHIFT while right clicking on it.
    2. Choose File-> Open… and open the following file;
      C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts
    3. Add the following line at the bottom.
      127.0.0.1        102.112.2o7.net
    4. Save the file and close Notepad.

    image
    4. Save the file.

  6. This will basically route 2o7.net request back to your computer, which will reject it, allowing you to read your emails quickly and in peace once again.
    This fix will work on 32/64 bit versions of both Vista and Win 7


If you still have a problem

In Microsoft Windows, use the command ipconfig /flushdns to flush the DNS resolver cache. Open the command prompt and type the following:
C:>ipconfig /flushdns
Windows IP Configuration
Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

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Corporate solution for all computer clients at once

If you are in a corporate network, your system administrators can fix this for everyone at once by adding a Forward Lookup Zone (Primary Zone) for the 102.112.2o7.net domain. Then add an A host record without a name and have it resolve to 127.0.0.1.

After PayPal fix the issue.

The invalid link when fixed will not fix messages already sent with the issue. So unless you permanently delete message with the problem, you will see the trouble each time outlook references them for reading. This is because the reference is totally invalid, not just temporarily down.

How to stop – Only secure content is displayed in IE9 message

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If you use IE9, you must be familiar with this message: “Only secure content is displayed.”

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This kind of messages are implemented by Microsoft because they want to inform you that you are about to access some unsecured content on a website. This is actually a security purpose message. Unfortunately, this kind of messages are more often annoying or unnecessary than useful. Internet explorer show this message when the same website page contain both secured and unsecured content: in this way, some unsecured scripts may have access to secured data on that page. Same thing happens when you play a game (unsecured scripts) on Facebook and want to publish that game information on your wall (secured action).

1. Launch Internet Explorer.
2. Go to Tools -> Internet Options.

Then, navigate to Security tab.

3. Click on “Custom level” button.

4. Search for “Display mixed content” under Miscellaneous section. Change it to enable.

Select Yes and that’s all.

Microsoft White Papers–Kill Me now!

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A Microsoft Team Member Accessing one of their White Papers!
Having just beaten the Microsoft CRM IFD challenge, I felt it necessary to blog about how mush I dislike the way Microsoft supply data about their own products.
The image above is not too far from the truth. You read a pile of “bla bal” data, only to find that the detail about the really important and difficult part is vague and relies on prior knowledge or experience to complete.
Evidence of this is the number of internal blogs, videos and instructional information that is always produced by MS team members and community members explaining the real low down on how to get their stuff to work.

Want to know what a White Paper is?

Google “Microsoft White Papers”
Returns this:
image
That opens to this:
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This gives a URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=5672
That fails to this:
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GO Microsoft!
So their Bing steps in with a suggestion. Did I mean
Do you mean service providers bus resources bizreswp?
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What?
Really Microsoft, things should be getting better, not worse!

Problem With DNN Blog Module 04.01.00 – 01

imageWe found an issue with what is the current release version of DotNetNuke Blog module 04.01.00 or 04.01.01.
First up, we don’t know what the version number should actually be, as the compiled version on the download is 04.01.00 but the source code is referenced as 04.01.01.
We presume there is some difference, but who knows what it is.

Anyway The Problem

The problem is that any forms on a page that run the blog module, will not allow form data to be validated. By validated, we are talking about ensuring a number is entered in a number field and text in a name filed etc.
The cause is the blog module is using an old ASP.Net 1.0 validation function. While it should be using ASP.NET 2.0 with the updated validation behaviours as found here:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0ke7bxeh.aspx
With this mistake, if you use Page.Validate on ASP.NET 2.0, page validation groups are ignored and the controls are validated.
Why the BLOG module is even coded this way is quite questionable in any case. However without DNN being a true open source system, we have no ability to fix this were needed in the source.

Our solution

We fixed the problem and recompiled a version that people can download an use for free.
Blog_04.01.01_Install A
You can install this on top of any DNN blog module 04.01.00 and we would expect that future releases of the blog module will not be affected by this version we compiled. However they may well revert back to their junk code in the future releases.

Should I Install Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

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They Say

They say the best technology is the technology you don’t notice. This is most definitely true for a lot of truly revolutionary technologies. Take the fuel management system on the Airbus A380. Constantly moving and controlling distribution of fuels around multiple systems, taking into account best distribution for weight and balance, safety, economy, possible errors and general automation of management.

A truly great example of technology that is unnoticed, and just goes about doing what it was designed to do well.

Then there is Windows 7 SP1

Before installing the update, you have to realise that Windows 7 is actually the in house patched (fixed up) version of the off shore experiment that went so terribly wrong for Microsoft. Windows Vista. With almost no new features in Windows 7, you could really call it the true SP1 to that junk they called Vista.

That in effect makes this SP1 release for Windows 7, a SP2 for Vista. In other words, they are really just fixing stuff they have either since found or did not have time to fix from the initial release.

Microsoft Themselves Recognise no Value in this Update

Take a look at their Windows 7 Service Pack 1 “What’s included in Windows 7 Service Pack 1(sp1)” website, and you begin to get the idea.

See the feature list?

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Me either… They list exactly nothing. Nothing is included in SP1 for Windows 7. They have no features, no additions and no reason to update.

One general reference only to “Reliability” and “HDMI Audio Services”. We already know that “reliability” is a word that has been banned from being used in conjunction with Microsoft products. But HDMI Audio…

Features

So you already can see where I am going with this. There are no features, there is nothing to draw you into this release. So if you are finding that your Windows 7 install has yet to fall apart and is otherwise working like a well service patched version of Vista. Then leave it alone!

If you are installing from scratch, then best practice would probably have you install SP1. I could not argue otherwise.

Be Warned.

Like all things Microsoft, there are plenty who wish they have not installed SP1. Some of the problems include:

Colour problems

Failure to install – "Installation was not successful" DS_S_SUCCESS(0x0)

Windows 7 SP1 Fails to Install ‘0x800f0826′

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 fails to install with 0x800f0a13

Fatal Error C000009A applying update operation [number] of [number]

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 – Installation Failure ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED(0×80070005)

Just to name a few issues.

Microsoft are so aware of these problems, that they have released an official tool to help you prevent your system from bugging you to install SP1. They call it the Windows Service Pack Blocker Tool Kit. Along with the Windows Live Writer, it is probably the best tool released by Microsoft since Steve became the boss there (Developers Developers Developers).

For My Money

Time is money, and my time is valuable. I’m leaving this one alone, as I simply don’t trust Microsoft any more. They are time bandits and service packs with no features and loads of problems, smell terribly like a time bandit about to suck up another day or two of my life in Microsoft Hell.

On Another Note

I am looking forward to Tomorrows WWDC 2011 Key Note Speech. It is ironic that I once was this excited about the Microsoft releases. I wonder what “magical” new things Apple have installed for me this year?

Codeplex InteractiveWebs Profile Updated

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Today we updated out profile at Codeplex http://www.codeplex.com/site/users/view/InteractiveWebs

mostly so that we could slam a review up for the latest dotnetnuke 5.6.2 release. The review points out that the release is not one of the worst releases of dotnetnuke, but it is buggy and caused us some problems. We are quite disappointed that this is the last 5x release, and hold little hope about the initial releases of DotNetNuke 6x.

Shame for all the hype and spin that dnn corporation have been putting on themselves that they are so happy to release such junk.

Problems with Windows Closing Programs and Logging off

Microsoft Fail of the Week! – Where are they going with all this?

I’m rather sick of Microsoft “fixing” things in version updates to Windows. Here is one I just love to hate.

I’m RDP into a server.

Doing some server work.

I finish and click log off. (Windows 2008 R2)

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I get a confirmation about it. – YES

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I get another confirmation about it – YES and Force

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Then is just sits there forever.

Now I remote check the server performance. Guess what. the server load is through the roof. And stays that way for a considerable amount of time.

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Remote shutdown is disabled, and failing.

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The machine is in some sort of Microsoft Hell.

Now it may be me, but did programs not shutdown correctly for like the last 15 years of Microsoft Windows, when you logged off.

As a server administrator, am I so daft that I need a reminder about logging off closing my programs, and a way that no earlier versions of Windows did, but now suddenly they have to invent a jquery style splash page that DOES NOT WORK.

Here is a tip for Microsoft. When you are working on new versions of software. MAKE THEM BETTER not worse than your last version!

Now when I next login, it is giving me some Shutdown Event Tracker errors:

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Where is the option for “It’s a busted ass Microsoft Bug”

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So I’m forced to comment in the usual server administrator way.

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Really why force me to type anything. I’m not a child!

Then I get this:

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No message, no “On solution found” it just disappears from screen. WTF.

It’s like they have beat me with a stick till I have to go and try a Mac. Honestly! Who’s running that place?

This looks serious about something. Can’t imagine it is GOOD QUALITY SOFTWARE! You?

Written with Windows Live Writer. The only good new software to come out of Microsoft in the last 10 years. Well done to the one dude that wrote it. Don’t let me screw it up into the future!

Removing IP from AOL email Black List postmaster

I’m finding the AOL process really really annoying. We have been trying to clear up blacklist and reputation problems with a new IP range that was previously abused.

AOL have some tools that pretend to help. What you need to know is this.

1. Ensure your mail server IP has a RDNS – so when you do an NS lookup on the IP address it will show a name, like smtp.interactivewebs.com

2. Setup an email account like abuse@ or postmaster@  that domain. Make sure you get that mail.

3. Ensure that you verify with AOL that you are the admin for that RDNS lookup name. That is by submitting a ticket called Feedback Loop here: http://postmaster.aol.com/SupportRequest.FBL.php

4. Wait till they verify your Feedback Loop. AKA. that you are getting mail on that domain.

6. Use this link: http://www.mxtoolbox.com/SuperTool.aspx?action=mx%3aaol.com
to work out the IP of an AOL mail server.

7. Work out what code error is given when you try to connect from your mail server using Telnet. Follow these instructions. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/153119 but use the IP address and port 25 of the AOL mail server from step 6 above.

8. Look at the error result and compare it to this page: http://postmaster.aol.com/Postmaster.Errors.php

9. Follow the support request process from that page, to submit a ticket to have them fix things up.

Easy as that.!


Imagine if we had to do that crap for every email domain in the world. This was a recent blog from AOL about their update:

http://postmaster-blog.aol.com/2011/05/05/general-update/

We are in the process of automating email problem report resolution. This is a mid-term project, and is being implemented in stages on a queue-by-queue basis. (Ex: Each unique error code type represents a different queue, as do feedback loop and whitelist requests. http://postmaster.aol.com/Postmaster.Errors.php )
The last couple of months were spent migrating our sundry ticketing systems onto one common platform — essentially readying a back-end for the front-end logic flow that you will interface with. We are excited to finally be addressing the part of this project that will offer, in most cases, immediate resolution to your issues.
We are starting with router-level queues, the first of which will be RTR:BB errors. I will post on our progress as we push the code into production, along with what ticket submitters should expect with the automated process specific to the queue addressed. If you are seeing problems with the queues in transition, please comment on that particular blog post, and we’ll take a look.
Meanwhile, our Postmaster staff will continue handling every ticket we receive.
Thanks for your patience and support during this transition!

 


This was my comment.

1. Good that you are improving things. Sucks that your process is so stupid in the first place. An example of how frigging annoying I am finding things.
We at: http://www.interactivewebs.com have been forced by a chapter 11 of an upstream provider to move all our servers to a new IP range.
First thing we did was to setup RDNS and check mail reputation (on all the major Black Lists, and senderbase.org). What we found was that the IP range has been abused. So we set about cleaning that up.
Naturally we checked AOL, and found that the IP was "undisclosed" reputation. Helpful Right… NOT!
But it does not show AOL was listing it.
So we move and fire up services. THEN and only then do we find out that AOL does have the address on a BL and mail cannot be delivered.
How about tools that work, and a process that works to allow proper checking/de-listing.
The ironic part of dealing with your 1990 process, is that it really does not work as well as other systems. AOL users get more spam than many other reputable spam systems. There is even free spam software services that do better.
So why stick with such a lame process, when the end result is HEAPS of false positives?

Windows 2008 File Content Search resx files–Solution

Today I was trying to achieve something that was simple in Windows 3.1. Searching a directory in Windows, and checking the content of files for the search term.

In this instance, I was searching something from the content of a Web Server directory that contained some resx files. These files are used in a DotNetNuke website to deliver language content to a module.

In every version of Windows up until the "Mac Version” (that is the version that makes you get a mac… i.e. Vista). the ability to search was easy.

Now, in Windows 2008 server, they have replicated the crap that they call search in Windows 7. So basically no one know how to resolve some strange results.

I search the net and found many solutions, but non worked for me.

This appears to be one solution: (but who knows)

  1. Open Server Manager and select Roles in the left pane.  Then in the center pane click on Add Roles.

    enable search 001 150x107 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  2. If you get the Before You Begin page just click Next, depending on if you have installed a role before and chose to skip this page in the future you might not see it.

    enable search 002 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  3. Select Server Roles window go ahead and select File Services and then click Next.

    enable search 003 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  4. The next page will discuss the File Services Role and what you can do with it. After reading go ahead and click Next.

    enable search 004 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  5. In the Select Role Services page place a check next to Windows Search Service and then clickNext.

    enable search 005 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  6. The next page will ask you to select the volumes you want to index.  Place a  check next to the volumes you want indexed and then click Next. As a note this is a test server so I don’t have separate data drives, be careful indexing your system drive as it can cause performance issues.

    enable search 006 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  7. Confirm your selections by reviewing the information and then click on Install.

    enable search 007 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

  8. Hopefully you see a Installation Succeeded message and you can click Close.

    enable search 008 150x110 Enable File Search on Windows Server 2008 with Windows Search Service

That’s it!  You will now be able to execute searches on the Windows server through Windows Search Services.

But

Because this is a web server, I really have no desire to turn on service that case the machine to run indexing all day long and possibly slow down my machine.

So I decided that after 30 minutes of rooting around like a novice on something as simple as this, I should stop wasting time and just do something I know.

I pulled down all the files to my local Windows 7 machine, and searched the files there. Low and behold, NOTHING. Apparently I did not give the machine enough time to index or something.

What Junk!

So I folder shared the files to my shiny Mac, and within a few seconds had the result that Microsoft failed to give me on two operating system, and to someone with years of server admin / network admin experience.

I find that as I get older, I just don’t have the time or inclination to jump through all the Microsoft hoops to get something like search to return a simple result.

Microsoft… you blow chunks!

Converting a physical Windows Machine to a Hyper-V Virtual Machine P2V Problem

We recently wanted to move a physical windows 2003 server to a virtual server. This is known as P2V. The machine happened to be a Windows 2003 Server running exchange.
One of the reasons we wanted to move, was because the hardware was getting a little long in the tooth, and for various reasons, we did not wish to upgrade the version of exchange.
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We were almost successful too, but as you will see, the nail in the coffin was a typical Microsoft issue. One that is just one more reason why our future avoids Microsoft wherever possible.

Convert P2V

To the physical machine, we installed a VM ware free tool known as VMware VCentre Converter. http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/
An easy to use free tool, that converts your physical machine into a virtual VM ware compatible single file. This file could be run on a VMware server. It is really easy to use and frankly like all VMware stuff… it just worked!
Cannot go without saying, that there is no Microsoft equivalent conversion tool.

Convert VM to Hyper V

To be able to use the VM single file, on a hyper V server, you need to convert it using the free tool from VM Tookkit http://vmtoolkit.com/blogs/announcements/archive/2006/11/20/vmdk-to-vhd-converter-available.aspx
This free little took, just runs agains the VMDK file and turns it into a VHD file.
Worked great thanks guys.

Mounting the VHD to Hyper V

Next and almost lastly, you just have to create a new HyperV virtual machine, and point it at your new VHD file that you have created and start the virtual machine.

Here is where it gets interesting

We managed to do all this, and turned on the virtual machine to one big problem. Microsoft Licensing.
Because the virtual instance detects new hardware, the Microsoft server drops into an unlicensed mode and wants to auto activate the license on the internet. Normally that would be fine, and you would just click on auto activate and wait 30 seconds before it auto activates.
Here is the problem. Because you have a new NIC network virtual instance, that has not been recognised by Windows, it will not allow you to connect to the internet until you install drivers. These drivers cannot be installed until you login. You cannot login until you activate….  and around and around we go on the Microsoft License ride!
There is no way around this, so the only option that is left to you is to contact Microsoft licensing via phone. So we called the licensing numbers listed in the Windows Server activation screen. These numbers were out of date and the phone calls failed. (Bummer that a multi billion $ company cannot redirect a phone number when it changes.)
So we researched the new phone numbers. Not actually that easy to find, and before long I was talking to a foreigner in a foreign country who could barely understand my Microsoft Licensing Query.
They were asking me for the activation code, so they could generate a new license key. After about 4 attempts of trying to understand the phonetic alphabet “B as in Bravo.. you say V as in Varo… No you idiod… BRAVO”. We found that the key generated by Microsoft failed, and wad never going to work.
Solution, is to bump up the chain, and submit a support ticket. Long and the short of it all was that while we had a fully licensed server that we have been running for years, that we could still access. With new hardware Microsoft were unable to generate a license key that would activate it manually. They advised that we should just auto activate!!!! WE COULD NOT EXPLAIN TO THE MONKEYS THAT THIS WAS NOT POSSIBLE. In order to get an internet connection we needed it to be active. Round and round we go… right!
They then advised that the only solution would be to install Windows server again. This was actually something we considered, as with a Virtual machine, there is nothing lost. Only problem was that to install the OS, you need the HyperV integration tools installed. To install them you need to login. To Login you need the license active… Round and round we go!

Solution

There was non. We were screwed by Windows 2003 licensing. MS could not help, and their stupid solution of “What you need to do here is reinstall” was no solution.
We failed!
But it’s not all bad. Before this, we had never really spent a lot of time with either VMware, or Linux servers. We have now! We love it, and more and more are enjoying everything that is non Microsoft. After years of accepting headache and heartache as a normal way of computing. We find that there is a better way…. stay away from Microsoft.

In fairness

This would not have been the case with a Windows 2008 server, as the license protection gives you a trial period to play. So the above process will work if you have a 2008 server. So we should not be too hard on MS, as they did improve one thing in the 5 years it took them to release 2008 server. The licensing does a trial mode.
Summary

In summary the process to follow is:

  1. Have a Windows 2008 server ready with Hyper-V – ours is a Dell PowerEdge 2970 with 16GB RAM, Dual quad-core AMD Opteron Processors, and a RAID 1/RAID 10 split for the OS/Storage. All the Hyper-V files run from the RAID 10 volume. This is good for about 12 guests.
  2. Install the VMWare convertor on the Hyper-V server. You don’t need to install the agent.
  3. Download the VMDK to VHD Convertor and unzip it to a local drive on the Hyper-V server (the desktop will do).
  4. Create a network share on the Hyper-V server that the target server can reach.
  5. Run the VMware converter against the target (it must be a Windows box, anything from NT4 upwards).
  6. Once complete (Our PE1750 with a 70GB disk took about 20 mins), point the VMDK to VHD converter at the new disk, and create a Hyper-V disk under your Hyper-V file location. Once complete, you can delete the VMDK file.
  7. Create a new Hyper-V virtual machine, using the new .VHD file as the boot disk. Don’t connect the machine to the physical network at this point.
  8. Boot the new Hyper-V machine, log in and let the hardware detection process run. Don’t insert the integration services disk yet. Reboot.
  9. Log in again and insert the integration services disk, and let it do its stuff. Reboot again.
  10. Log in a third time, and let the install complete. One more reboot!
  11. Log in now and have a look at the network settings. If you can’t see anything, you’ll need to shut down the guest and install a legacy adapter.
  12. Tidy up stuff that isn’t needed for a virtual machine – typically hardware management stuff.
  13. If all is good, shut down the old box, connect the network to your new virtual machine and fire it up!

DotNetNuke User Experience Team Cracks Me Up

Today it was drawn to my attention that the DotNetNuke Corporation has a User Experience Team. Good on DNN Corp for caring about UI, and so they should.
What cracks me up about it is this.
Go to the webpage and seek more information on the UI team members. First from the list is Joe Brinkman. (Not picking on you Joe, but your smile is first on the list).
 
imageNotice the *******, Ohio ********* (Funny hay)
Where is my User Experience I would like to know? How can a UI team allow the details page of their team profile pictures look like that… I’m still laughing about it as I write it now.
Are you serious???
 
 
 
This is like one of those Microsoft jokes they play on me as a system admin. They give me an error log, with a meaningless code in an event view… then for a joke they give me a link to a support site that has NO SUPPORT.
image
They even call the link a help and support link. Yet every link has exactly NO help.image
Now I am sure that there is a big counter on the wall in Microsoft land, with a big number ticking over for every time a users clicks a help link and gest NO HELP! They are sitting there watching and laughing so hard that they did not see apple dominating their market for the last 5 years.
I wonder if the DNN UI team has something similar… something that at least gives them a laugh each time a user clicks for more information about the team, and finds not only… absolutely NO INFORMATION, but NO INFORMATION DELIVERED WITH THE WORST UI POSSIBLE!